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When It’s Better to Pay More

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I’ve been ordering groceries from Kroger’s Click List so I wouldn’t have to go in (because of coronavirus concerns), but that requires scheduling a few days in advance. Today’s earliest time slot was 4/23 evening. Not bad, really. But I miss being able to go buy whatever I want for dinner. I rarely do that, but I could. But the other day I went shopping at Dorothy Lane Market (upscale grocery) and it was lovely. Totally stocked, not crowded, sparkling clean. Things cost more there, though. Meat prices are crazy. But I kinda want to go shop there next time I need groceries. The produce is gorgeous. They have a “healthy living” department that smells So Good. Great selection of wine and beer... on and on.  Do I want to pay the extra money for that experience? I am rather frugal, so before I’d never go there for anything besides their salad bar and soup for lunch.  Well, I started thinking about the “race to the bottom” concept. It’s taken over our culture. We want everything che

Photographic Time Travel

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Have you ever said, "I was born in the wrong era"? I've said it myself. I don't know if I really mean it, though. True, today's world has a lot of problems, but we tend to romanticize times past. In the "good old days," women were (even more) objectified, women and minorities had (even less) equal rights, and depending on the era, you were (even more) likely to die from an illness that can be treated now with antibiotics or an outpatient procedure. Yeah, no thanks. People will look at the price of something — gasoline, say — and talk about how much cheaper it used to be. "I can remember when a candy bar was only a quarter." Yeah, me too, but I got paid $3.35 an hour. When our grandparents bought their house for $12,000 and a car for $1,300, their paychecks were about $60 a week. I know. I've seen my mom's old pay stubs from 1960. Still, romanticizing the past can be a lot of fun. From our modern perspective, we can enjoy the pleas

Real or Repro? Read the Fine Script

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My co-owner and dear hubby spotted an interesting listing on eBay: Civil war confederate documents. Signed by Jefferson Davis and LP Walker Description: "Was dug from the ground on property in Woodbridge VA" One of the best arguments I've seen for continuing to teach cursive writing to schoolchildren is that without it, they won't be able to read historical documents. Surely, that must be the case here — the sad degradation of literacy — because this item is currently bid up to $305 with two days left. In particular, it pays to read dates. Perhaps today's Civil War buffs have lost the ability to translate years into long form. Are they not teaching that in school these days? Maybe not, since my college-age kids don't know Roman numerals. If a book is copyrighted MCMXLVII, they will have no clue that it was printed in 1947. And our current year, in long form? Two thousand nineteen. That's an easy one. How about One thousand nine hund

Old-Fashioned Wisdom: Go Ahead, Ask a "Dumb Question"

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And now for something different, because this blog isn’t just for bragging about our travel. We don’t travel a lot, anyway. We are busy people and most of our money goes back into the shop (or to finance kids in college). I’ve only been on an airplane once (twice, counting the return trip). I’ve only been out of the country for a few hours, during a brief sightseeing afternoon in Niagara Falls’ Canadian side (It’s much nicer, by the way). So, if I decided to take a trip on an airplane, I’d be nervous. Flying scares a lot of people, but also I’d be afraid of the whole process of checking bags, checking myself in, going through security, boarding. When we took our one trip by plane, I had no idea they passed out cookies and drinks and earbuds for a two-hour flight. I still don’t know how to check and pick up suitcases because the Disney people did it all. Some people are fearless — others shy away from new experiences, and sometimes this is because they don’t wa

Old-Fashioned Travel: Tybee Island & Old Fort Jackson, GA

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There's plenty to see in Savannah. It's a beautiful city, full of history. But you'll be missing a lot if you don't venture out to other nearby areas. We only had a day to do so, but we always pack a lot into those short trips! Tybee Island is about 20 minutes' drive from downtown historic Savannah. It's a barrier island, and a popular spot for families to vacation during the summertime and enjoy the sunny beach. More laid-back than many other beach vacation spots, there's plenty to do there during the warmer months. Of course, we visited in January, so we weren't sure what to expect. We found... history ! First stop: Tybee Island Lighthouse. You can read all about its history on the website, but here's a summary. The first version, a "day mark" — lighthouse without a light — was built in 1736. It was destroyed by storms. The current structure dates to 1773, but the stairs and top 40 feet of the brick-and-wood structure were burn

Old-Fashioned Travel: Savannah

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I highly recommend winter vacation trips. Last year, my husband started our new tradition of taking a trip for my birthday in January. We can do this now, since our kids are grown and it’s a pretty slow time for the shop. It's also a real treat to escape the frigid weather and head south for a while! Last year we went to Nashville for two days. His choice. This year I got to decide, and I picked Savannah. I highly recommend Savannah, especially if you love history. In Savannah's Historic District, there are a lot of lodging options, including lovely historical hotels. We chose Planter's Inn, built in 1812. Not only is it a lovely building, it's also supposed to be haunted — but aren't all old buildings? We didn't meet any spirits, but we did enjoy the complimentary wine-and-cheese reception daily at 5:30. It's fun to chat with other guests in their sumptuous lobby. Planter's is located in the heart of the historic district, and we p